Sarah Donelan

Sarah Donelan

Graduate Student

It is well established that predation risk operates strongly within one generation of prey, but little is known about how it may operate across prey generations. Parental effects have been shown to buffer offspring from various environmental stressors in many natural systems. It may be adaptive for parents of prey to prepare their offspring for risk exposure if risk cues are predictable. My work examines how parental exposure to predation risk influences nonconsumptive effects in prey offspring in a rocky intertidal food chain (with Carcinus maenas as predator, Nucella lapillus as prey and mussels and barnacles as a basal resource for Nucella).

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